Reaction to Joey Barton vs. Lewis Hamilton

http://www.f1racinggrid.co.uk/reaction-joey-bartons-criticism-hamilton/

Two days ago, Lewis Hamilton won the 2014 SPOTY award and a day later, QPR midfielder, Joey Barton (who I guess is not the Mercedes driver’s biggest fan), took to Twitter to criticise the double world champion.

Take a look at what he tweeted:

I’ve written this post to set Barton’s facts straight. I don’t want to say that the midfielder is an idiot as I’m not that type of person. However, it was a coincidence that I read an article in the 14th December 2014 issue of the Sunday Times Style magazine as the racer reveals where he pays his tax. On Page 22, Hamilton said, “What people don’t realise is that I pay tax here (in England), but I don’t earn all of my money here.” He then continued with, “I race in 19 different countries and I pay in several different places, and I pay a lot here as well. I am contributing to the country and not only that, I help to keep a team of more than 1,000 people employed. I’m a part of a much bigger picture.”

Lewis Hamilton

So there’s the evidence in a nutshell for you. I just wanted to show Hamilton’s side of the story and that Barton is incorrect in his tweet.

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The Verstappen effect: Feeder series obsolete

thejudge13

Are feeder series systems, as we know them, becoming obsolete, perhaps even redundant?

Now don’t get me wrong, there will always be demand for feeder series. But is the concept of it in need of a change? First, I’m not talking about karting. For the love of God, let the kids play in their karts! It is there where they get their first feel of how racing should be. To quote Senna: ‘I started racing go-karts. And I love karts. It’s the most breathtaking sport in the world. More than F1 indeed. I used to like it the most.’  

Big words coming from the best Formula One driver of all time. -I said best, not most titles- But as we all know the one with the most titles also started out in karts. -For those of you living in Germany, the Netherlands or Belgium, you might have been to…

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The Verstappen effect: feeder series obsolete – Money talks — thejudge13

READ PART 1 More than meets the eye How much would it actually cost to get in Formula One these days? We all see the reports of how much some drivers, allegedly, bring as backing once they’re on the verge of becoming a Formula One driver. And for some we see a number alongside their […]

via The Verstappen effect: feeder series obsolete – Money talks — thejudge13

Ferrari to lose special rights

The sports imminent new owners Liberty Media, have suggested that future prize money allocation rules could change – and that Ferrari could also lose their financial privileges from the dividing of the F1 pie. The takeover from Liberty is expected to be completed this month, with the future direction of the sport now being thrust […]

via Ferrari to lose special rights — thejudge13

An Indycar World Cup?

Indycar is currently struggling to compete with NASCAR amongst American fans. In order to help this, an Indycar World Cup could revive this ailing series. It would be a chance to hire new blood and showcase American sponsors on a global scale. Starting in 2017, it would be a farewell tour for the much maligned Dallara DW12 (named in honour of the late Dan Wheldon). Here is a provisional calendar consisting of five events, of which three will take place in Asia and two in North America:

2017-18 CALENDAR

JAP, Fuji (3 December) Asian Le Mans (ROAD- 55 laps/250km)
USA, Homestead-Miami 300 (17 December) STAND-ALONE (OVAL- 200 laps)
THA, Chang (7 January) Asian Le Mans (ROAD- 55 laps/250km)
MAL, Sepang (21 January) Asian Le Mans (ROAD- 46 laps/ 250km)
MEX, Mexico City (3 February) STAND-ALONE (ROAD- 71 laps/305km)
MEX, Mexico City (4 February) STAND-ALONE (ROAD- 71 laps/305km)

It will be ran under the same regulations INDYCAR use for their premier Verizon Indycar Series championship, only whoever wins the Indycar World Cup is crowned “Indy World Champion”. The series champion will receive the Vanderbilt Cup, formerly awarded to the champion of now-defunct CART series championship.

Pirelli threatens to pull out of F1 if test plan is not agreed TODAY

Paul Hembery on today’s F1 Commission approval:

This is it. We cannot do our job without this. We cannot deliver.

The continuing procrastination over 2017 regulations has reared its ugly head once again, with F1’s sole tyre supplier showing its frustration at F1 Strategy Group’s inability to ratify a coherent plan to reform the physics of the cars.

Pirelli has developed a rather mixed reputation since its return to F1 in 2011, with the tyre blow out incidents at 2013 British & 2015 Belgian Grands Prix incurring the ire of teams across the paddock. It appears this news announcement is a cunning attempt by Paul Hembery and his executives to arrest some political power towards themselves, as the Italian tyre supplier attempts to redeem its image. It is clear that Pirelli are stuck in an existential crisis, having indulged many of FIA’s wishes for variable tyres with a wide range of degradation and performance. However, it has struggled to avoid heat sensitivity issues related to their compounds, with many teams and drivers infuriated by unpredictable operating temperatures and tyre pressures required to achieve optimum performance and mileage from the Pirellis.

A much touted belief amongst F1 Strategy Group revolves around wider car and bigger tyres, raising the wheel rims from 13 inches to 18 inches. However, there is much debate over the effects over the handling of the cars, as well as how the tyres and the enlarged size of the cars will affect the ergonomics of the driver’s seating position and his peripheral vision. It was Michelin who proposed the idea of larger wheel rim, but Martin Brundle’s unfavourable verdict of this when he tested a modified GP2 car at Monaco, it was quietly shelved. Michelin had been contenders to take over as F1’s control tyre supplier for this season, but disagreements with FIA over the manufacture of tyres meant their return failed to materialise.

Pirelli clearly want as much time as possible to eradicate these prevalent issues, but whether the CEOs are willing to cut their losses and pull the plug on its ailing project is one to be seen.